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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of molecular analysis of temperature dependent sex deterimination in Alligator mississippiensis. found in the catalog.

molecular analysis of temperature dependent sex deterimination in Alligator mississippiensis.

Anne-Marie Coriat

molecular analysis of temperature dependent sex deterimination in Alligator mississippiensis.

by Anne-Marie Coriat

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Published by University of Manchester in Manchester .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Manchester thesis (Ph.D.), School of Biological Sciences.

ContributionsUniversity of Manchester. School of Biological Sciences.
The Physical Object
Pagination266p.
Number of Pages266
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16572871M

alligator, mating systems, microsatellites, multiple paternity, mutation rate, population genetics Received 29 July ; revision received 25 October ; accepted 25 October Introduction Many molecular techniques currently available allow insight into areas of reproductive dynamics and patterns of. Temperature dependent sex determination (TSD) has been demonstrated for loggerhead (Caretta caretta), green (Chelonia mydas), leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) turtles. Molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are unknown. Review of the literature suggests.

  Many reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). The initial cue in TSD is incubation temperature, unlike genotypic sex determination (GSD) where it is determined by the presence of specific alleles (or genetic loci). We used patterns of gene expression to identify candidates for genes with a role in TSD and other developmental Cited by: 8. The evolutionary significance of temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles Cayla Teller Rollins College Department of Biology Holt Avenue Winter Park, FL 1 Teller: Sex Determination in Reptiles Published by Rollins Scholarship Online,

  Temperature-controlled turtle sex gene found. By Mary Halton fully deciphering the process of temperature-dependent sex determination remains "the magic bullet that has eluded scientists since.   A Novel Candidate Gene for Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination in the Common Snapping Turtle. Genetics, vol. , no. 1, pp. ; doi: /genetics Published in.


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Molecular analysis of temperature dependent sex deterimination in Alligator mississippiensis by Anne-Marie Coriat Download PDF EPUB FB2

Here we demonstrate by laboratory and field experiments, that in A. mississippiensis: (1) Sex is fully determined at the time of hatching and naturally irreversible thereafter, and depends on the Cited by: In the wild, temperature probes were placed in alligator nests constructed in three different habitats: wet marsh, dry marsh and levee (elevated firm ground).

The position of the eggs in the nests were mapped at 60 days incubation and the sex of the enclosed hatchlings correlated with the nest temperatures at that by: L.S.

Hayward, D.S. Busch, in Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior, Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination. The organizational effects of hormones are sometimes temperature dependent, with many reptiles exhibiting temperature-dependent sex sensitivity may pose a conservation concern as temperatures increase globally and humans.

The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) displays temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), in which incubation temperature during embryonic development determines the sexual fate of the individual. However, the molecular mechanisms governing this process remain a mystery, including the influence of initial environmental temperature on the Cited by:   This system of sex determination is called temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), and a TSP for TSD has been defined for the American alligator as stages 21–24 [Lang and Andrews, ].

Unlike in mammals, estrogens play a central role in the sex determination of fish, birds, crocodilians, and turtles [ Crews, ; Devlin and Cited by:   Temperature of egg incubation determines sex in Alligator mississippiensis hatchlings.

To define the timing and morphology of sexual differentiation, alligator gonads were examined histologically and ultrastructurally throughout embryogenesis. At the male-producing temperature (33° C), the onset of testis differentiation occurred in most embryos during Cited by: One of the best-studied reptiles is the European pond turtle, Emys obicularis.

In laboratory studies, incubating Emys eggs at temperatures above 30°C produces all females, while temperatures below 25°C produce all-male broods. The threshold temperature (at which the sex ratio is even) is °C (Pieau et al. ).The developmental period during which sex Cited by: Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination in the AmericanAlligator: AMH Precedes SOX9 Expression PATRICK S.

WESTERN,1,2 JENNY L. HARRY,3 JENNIFER A. MARSHALL GRAVES,2 AND ANDREW H. SINCLAIR1* 1Department of Paediatrics and Centre for Hormone Research, University of Melbourne, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. stitutes a selective biological advantage for the evolution of temperature-dependent sex determination in Alligator mississippiensis.

The occurrence of temperature-dependent sex determination in alligators has wide-ranging implications for embryological, teratological, molecular, phylogenetic. conservation and farming studies. Some reptiles such as crocodilians and some turtles are known to display temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), where the ambient temperature.

The molecular mechanisms that underlie sex determination and differentiation are conserved and diversified. In fish species, temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation seem to be ubiquitous and molecular players involved in these mechanisms may be conserved.

Although how the ambient temperature transduces signals to the undifferentiated Cited by: Metabolic heating of embryos and sex determination in the American Alligator, Alligator mississippiensis Article in Journal of Thermal Biology 28(2).

Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) was first described for a crocodilian in Alligator mississippiensis, in which egg incubation at 33°C produces %. american alligator, Alligator mississippiensis M.A. Ewert*, C.E. Nelson Department of Biology, Indiana University, Jordan HallEast 3rd Street, Bloomington, INUSA Received 18 April ; accepted 4 October Abstract 1.

The potential for metabolic heating by embryonic reptilesto influence temperature-dependent sex. Novel characterization of gene expression in reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination such as American alligators may inform the evolution of sex-determining and sex-differentiating gene networks as they suggest alternative functions from which the genes may have been exapted.

DEVELOPMENTAL GENETICS () Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination in Reptiles: Proximate Mechanisms, Ultimate Outcomes, and Practical Applications DAVID CREWS, JUDITH M. BERGERON, JAMES J. BULL, DEBORAH FLORES, ALAN TOUSIGNANT,File Size: 1MB.

Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) is a type of environmental sex determination in which temperature experienced during embryonic development influence the sex of the offspring. It has been shown to occur in many fish (Conover ), most turtles (Ewert et al. ), and some lizards (Rhen and Crews ).

10 Yuiko Matsumoto, David Crews, Molecular mechanisms of temperature-dependent sex determination in the context of ecological developmental biology, Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology,CrossRef; 11 Daniel A.

Warner, Hormones and Reproduction of Vertebrates,1CrossRef. Ospina-Álvarez N, Piferrer F. Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination in Fish Revisited: Prevalence, a Single Sex Ratio Response Pattern, and Possible Effects of Climate Change.

PLoS ONE, Molecular players involved in temperature-dependent sex determination and sex differentiation in Teleost fish Zhi-Gang Shen1,2 and Han-Ping Wang1* Abstract The molecular mechanisms that underlie sex determination and differentiation are conserved and diversified.

In fish. 1. Introduction. Although use of the pesticide DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane) has been severely restricted in many industrialized nations, its widespread use in tropical regions along with the persistence of its metabolites has maintained its status as an environmental contaminant of investigations into its toxicity in non-target organisms include the Cited by:   Given that some analytes, such as PO 2, PCO 2 and pH, are temperature dependent (Glass et al., ), we measured alligator cloacal temperatures at the time of sample collection to correct for temperature variation among individuals and used temperature-corrected values for subsequent statistical analyses.

Statistical analysisCited by: 8.For many species, sex is determined by environmental factors experienced during development. Many reptiles have temperature-dependent sex temperature embryos experience during their development determines the sex of the organism.

In some turtles, for example, males are produced at lower incubation temperatures than females; this difference in .